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JohnC

Traffic Congestion

This article was on the BBC website today and it is hardly a surprise:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-38156700

When local authorities put bus lanes and bus gates in all over the place, some with 24hr restrictions for no good reason what do they expect. The road in front of my office is a 30mph dual carriageway with one lane restricted to buses, except at the lights - so you get half a mile of stationary traffic in one lane, one bus every 5 minutes in the other and you need to wait until you are 50 yds from the lights before the bus lane ends. The congestion is ridiculous and largely unnecessary.

As for Edinburgh, the car hating capital of the western world - they have a policy of creating jams to "persuade" drivers to take alternative transport, so what do they expect?
JohnC

It was strange, having written the post above to hear on the breakfast news today that it is now being advocated that speed bumps and other impediments should be removed to allow traffic to flow more freely since it emits less pollution when moving than when stood still going nowhere.......and that is supposed to be news to those with any common sense?
Bob Sacamano

We've had a classic from Newcastle City Council. They decided that the dual carriageway on John Dobson Street with it's bus lanes wasn't green enough so they closed one side and made it a two way cycle path. Cue absolute mayhem as buses and taxis try to squeeze into the remaining road, blocking junctions, bringing the city to a standstill. Passengers on the buses now have plenty of time  to look left and try and spot the odd cyclist on the empty cycleway as they go nowhere.
Tim

Dundee have had a lot of fun screwing up the traffic at the waterfront with an excessive amount of new traffic lights, all with pedestrian crossings attached.
When you come off the Tay Bridge there's a set of lights at the bottom of the slip road followed by another set less than 100 yards further on. The latter ones cover 4 lanes so stay red for a long time.
Then there's another set about 200 yards further on.
It's even worse heading the opposite direction on the other side of the new green space they've put in opposite the V&A building.

And all the congestion is made worse by people's recently found impatience that leads them to queue across traffic light controlled junctions nowadays  
PG

I found this publication on the web a few days ago.

https://www.gov.uk/government/upl...le/514912/road-use-statistics.pdf

Basically, instead of declaring constant "war" on motorists, all arms of government need to recognise two key things -
1. Cars are how most people get about - commute, shop, socialise etc. The statisitcs in the link are all government statisitcs.  
2. To try and stop that by a combination of cost (tax), making it bloody inconvenient and "stick" approaches does not work as the genie is out of the bottle.

Cities might want to reduce car use and it may well be an overall improvement if they did, but the stick does not work. They've got to apply the carrot - massive edge of city parking areas where there are links to mass transit systems; cheap public transport - all need to be 24 hours per day as well.

Fucking muppets, all of them.
Big Blue

When I did my first degree one of the studies we did was redevelopment of areas around docklands. One of my recommendations was to build a hyper-car park with mass transit links into the west. I was talking gargantuan size over two or three levels and continuous loop trains that stopped across platforms, emptied out then the next set moved on to platform level. Trouble is this is one of those macro change ideas that would never get going.

Imagine if it had been built: a spur line could be built going south of the river into Kent leading to a massive new purpose built modern airport on reclaimed marshland.
PhilD

Big Blue wrote:


Imagine if it had been built: a spur line could be built going south of the river into Kent leading to a massive new purpose built modern airport on reclaimed marshland.


BB Island!

"Your" park and ride idea is a good one, and when London finally grinds to a halt I'm sure it will be embraced.  Macro change happens when it has to.
Frank Bullitt

PG wrote:
I found this publication on the web a few days ago.

https://www.gov.uk/government/upl...le/514912/road-use-statistics.pdf

Basically, instead of declaring constant "war" on motorists, all arms of government need to recognise two key things -
1. Cars are how most people get about - commute, shop, socialise etc. The statisitcs in the link are all government statisitcs.  
2. To try and stop that by a combination of cost (tax), making it bloody inconvenient and "stick" approaches does not work as the genie is out of the bottle.

Cities might want to reduce car use and it may well be an overall improvement if they did, but the stick does not work. They've got to apply the carrot - massive edge of city parking areas where there are links to mass transit systems; cheap public transport - all need to be 24 hours per day as well.

Fucking muppets, all of them.


This does work in the U.K., I'd cite Cambridge as an example. It helps that there is a cultural acceptance that bikes are the preferred method of travel in the city, park-and-ride is well serviced adnd travel around the suburbs is reasonably easy.  It's not perfect, but pretty good.
PG

Frank Bullitt wrote:
...Cities might want to reduce car use and it may well be an overall improvement if they did, but the stick does not work. They've got to apply the carrot - massive edge of city parking areas where there are links to mass transit systems; cheap public transport - all need to be 24 hours per day as well.

Fucking muppets, all of them.


This does work in the U.K., I'd cite Cambridge as an example. It helps that there is a cultural acceptance that bikes are the preferred method of travel in the city, park-and-ride is well serviced adnd travel around the suburbs is reasonably easy.  It's not perfect, but pretty good.[/quote]

I agree with you that it works in smaller cities and towns where park and ride and space for parking exists. But for larger conurbations it is hopeless at the moment. No space for the massive car parks that BB recommended (or a suitable road network to get people to them in the first place) and little desire to rapidly develop proper transport systems. Instead it is all stick - make it really hard for people to drive anywhere and they will stop driving. Er...no. They'll just move their business elsewhere.

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