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PG

Tesla Model S

Well not me, but second hand by a friend who runs his family engineering company. Our email exchange went -

<<Him - Test drove the Tesla Model S on Sunday, I want one now....

Me - The cooking version (£50k) or the Sports one as tested in Autocar (£80k+)? Although their view seemed to be the sports one was not worth the extra, although the bigger batteries clearly are worth it for the range.
Company car and low BIK + 100% capital allowances I think too?

Him - The £80k one. Acceleration was blistering. The Tesla chap admitted that even with the better batteries, if you gave it some beans you were looking at only a 150 mile range.

Yes 100% FYA at the moment but as the BIK is going up very steeply over the next few years, it may not make it so worthwhile. I haven't done the maths yet.

One slight difficulty was the ginormous touch screen that seemed to control everything. If like me you need reading glasses but can see perfectly well out of the car window 30 miles into the distance without glasses, you cannot read the bloody screen! >>


There you have it then. Hardly an indepth exchange of views, but coming from a chap who currently has a BMW 840i as a daily driver and also has a 1971 Rover 3500 P5B Coupe, a 1990's BMW 7 series knock about and a Triumph motorbike, the Tesla has clearly turned his head. Which must mean something.

Fuller autocar review here - http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-revi...sla-model-s-uk-first-drive-review

I reckon if they could get the range over 250 miles to maybe 300 miles at a motorway cruise, they'd remove most range anxiety? As long as you had access to the 245 million amp 3 phase chargers that recharge it in an hour. Otherwise the charge time seems enormous.
Big Blue

That screen!

Still laughing out loud.....
Parm

I saw and sat in one of these at the Tesla "showroom" in the Westfield shopping centre.
That touch screen is flippin' huge and, as much as it seems like the "future", I'd much prefer physical controls for some features - air-con, basic stereo functions etc.
Racing Teatray

I want one too. I had a heavy-duty external electricity spur installed outside in the driveway when we did the house renovations. Did that with the long term aim of automating the entrance gates but I guess it could equally be adapted to be a highly convenient charge-point.

I do agree though that the screen is not my favourite feature - it looks like an afterthought apart from anything else.
PG

I can't make up my mind if the huge touchscreen is comically bad or cool.

I do find a sat-nav screen (at minimum brightness) in my peripheral vision bad enough at night. So having a 27inch Mac strapped to the dash must be a bit disconcerting.
PhilD

First time Iíve seen kids seats in the boot of a hatchback!
gonnabuildabuggy

Re: Tesla Model S

PG wrote:

There you have it then. Hardly an indepth exchange of views, but coming from a chap who currently has a BMW 840i as a daily driver and also has a 1971 Rover 3500 P5B Coupe, a 1990's BMW 7 series knock about and a Triumph motorbike, the Tesla has clearly turned his head. Which must mean something.


An impressive collection.
Giant

The one thing car manufacturers seem to have completely overlooked with touch screens is that you can't use them without taking your eye off the road as your fingers can't locate the 'buttons' on the screen by feel. A traditional dash with dial heater controls etc can be felt around by finger tip, and quickly learnt to be used intuitively with minimal concentration, let alone eye sight, taken away from the road ahead.
Martin

Giant wrote:
The one thing car manufacturers seem to have completely overlooked with touch screens is that you can't use them without taking your eye off the road as your fingers can't locate the 'buttons' on the screen by feel. A traditional dash with dial heater controls etc can be felt around by finger tip, and quickly learnt to be used intuitively with minimal concentration, let alone eye sight, taken away from the road ahead.


Exactly.  The rotary controller and short cut buttons in the BMW means you can get into most things without looking at the screen.   I don't like touch screens in cars at all, luckily there is a dial next to the screen and buttons on the wheel in the Boxster.
Racing Teatray

Never mind the Tesla, I like the sound of this:

http://www.pistonheads.com/news/default.asp?storyId=30148
PG

For a car driver who wants a commuter bike, I've always thought these make most sense. And as they are a three-wheeler, you can drive them (or should that be ride them) on a car licence. Not the last word in cool, but very functional and probably "safer" than pure two wheels for rusty or first time bikers in an urban environment.

http://www.uk.piaggio.com/piaggio...mp3-lt/version-LT-500-Sp-abs.html


Racing Teatray

Yes, but no.
PG

Racing Teatray wrote:
Yes, but no.


I know what you mean. They do have a certain naffness - like still needing stabilisers on your first bicycle. But having seen one brake really hard whilst swerving in Paris traffic and the driver escape unscathed, the two wheels at the front makes a lot of city-bike sense.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

Not over-amused by Tesla, or more specifically their arrangements with Panasonic.  Some typre of Panasonic lithium-ion batteries are now in very short supply as Tesla have effectively commandeered at least one of Panasonic's production lines to cope with demand for batteries for the cars.  It's having a noticeable effect on some parts of industry where the use of certain products is heavily regulated, and you can't just go out and buy an alternative Li-ion cell from somewhere else
Big Blue

Those three wheeled things are a PITA!
Tim

Chris M Wanted a V-10 wrote:
Not over-amused by Tesla, or more specifically their arrangements with Panasonic. †Some typre of Panasonic lithium-ion batteries are now in very short supply as Tesla have effectively commandeered at least one of Panasonic's production lines to cope with demand for batteries for the cars. †It's having a noticeable effect on some parts of industry where the use of certain products is heavily regulated, and you can't just go out and buy an alternative Li-ion cell from somewhere else


There's a company in Dundee called Axeon that makes those batteries. I think they were involved with the Rolls Royce electric car and maybe JLR.
They're part of Johnson Mathey now.
Their main focus is rechargeable batteries for power tools.
Alf McQueef

Giant wrote:
The one thing car manufacturers seem to have completely overlooked with touch screens is that you can't use them without taking your eye off the road as your fingers can't locate the 'buttons' on the screen by feel. A traditional dash with dial heater controls etc can be felt around by finger tip, and quickly learnt to be used intuitively with minimal concentration, let alone eye sight, taken away from the road ahead.


Definitely. I had to stop myself messing about with the screen in the 1 series loaners I had this year, and that was in a very basic spec. You can access far too much too easily when moving... It simply is not safe to be messing about reading screens when driving, and these massive touch screens just make it worse. The law will jump on you from a great height (quite rightly) if you are found to have been fiddling with your satnav or - far worse - reading and writing text and email on your phone when you crashed. Some existing in car systems (let alone whatever touch-screen stuff they will release in the future) are just as distracting. Surely at some point much if not all of it will be disabled when moving, and then buttons may seem a good idea again.

One thing is for sure - any sort of screen-based solution ages much worse than a button. Watch some old sci-fi movies if you don't believe me. It's always the phones/computers/screens that give the age away. Look at the blocky ZX81 graphics in Star Wars - that's what your big screen stuff in a Tesla will look like in the future!!
Frank Bullitt

That screen is a joke, surely? Awful, just awful.
Tim

Frank Bullitt wrote:
That screen is a joke, surely? Awful, just awful.


It's high tech, innit.
Buttons are just so old fashioned.
PhilD

Tim wrote:
Frank Bullitt wrote:
That screen is a joke, surely? Awful, just awful.


It's high tech, innit.
Buttons are just so old fashioned.


its not the tech, its the look! The car itself is also a bit generic, they need to employ some decent designers.
Tim

I think that in a world with the bland products from BMW and Audi (bland simply because they're so common and there's little to differentiate between models except size) and the downright unattractive propositions from Merc the Tesla looks pretty decent although it reminds me of the big Hyundai saloon.
Actually it might be the Kia Optima saloon I'm thinking of (I checked the website, I didn't know that name, honest) which, on the rare occasions I've seen one, makes me think it could be a BMW if they hadn't gone all fussy.
PhilD

Kia Optima is a few messy details away from being a great design. Even if it is just a Mondeo crossed with a E60.
cbeaks1

Speaking of Mondeos, I Spent some time with a new Mondeo titanium estate (with x pack) yesterday. It is really very very nice. Physically a real leap from the current model, and properly desirable.
PhilD

cbeaks1 wrote:
Speaking of Mondeos, I Spent some time with a new Mondeo titanium estate (with x pack) yesterday. It is really very very nice. Physically a real leap from the current model, and properly desirable.


The new Aston Mondeo?
Giant

It's been so long since it was revealed it feels old news already.
cbeaks1

I promise, top spec in the flesh with led headlights looks great.
Martin

My dad had one as a hire car the last time he was in Canada (Fusion titanium), it had a good spec and the 2.0 ecoboost engine and 4WD.  He was pretty impressed with it.

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