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Twelfth Monkey

Surely this is chortlesome?

http://www.tcsdanbury.co.uk/vehicles/vehicleDetails.aspx?vehicleId=567

7k for a 1987 XR2?
Bob Sacamano

As I've said before; if you're a dealer and you get hold of one of these in mint condition it's worth chancing your arm for a few weeks and stick it on sale at a daft price - you might just catch some bloke with a bit of spare cash and wanting to acquire the dream car of his youth that he couldn't afford then.
gonnabuildabuggy

Perhaps not. I suspect it would be a better investment than what most of us are driving given it's age, provenance and mileage assuming it's in matching condition.
gonnabuildabuggy

Bob Sacamano wrote:
As I've said before; if you're a dealer and you get hold of one of these in mint condition it's worth chancing your arm for a few weeks and stick it on sale at a daft price - you might just catch some bloke with a bit of spare cash and wanting to acquire the dream car of his youth that he couldn't afford then.


That's exactly how classic dealers seem to work - prices a lot higher than private sales but a different market.

Classic sales are all about people buying what they can finally afford and lusted after when younger IMHO.

That price doesn't look too mad when I consider what I've sold my classics for privately.

EDIT - quick look through car and classic shows a few good ones between 6-7K with good private ones around 4-5K and some poorer ones at less money.

I actually got to thinking this would be a good car for me - small enough for easy commuting, modern enough but easy to fix. I've driven them and they are fun. A lot more go kart like than the Golf GTi of that era.
PG

I prefer the earlier XR2 - that didn't have the fold over bonnet. not sure I'd pay 7k for one, but when a decent E Type is going into 6 figures, 7k suddenly seems reasonable..... in a perverse way.
Scouse

There was a normal Capri 2.8 in this month's Octane classifieds and 12500...
Alf McQueef

Yes its silly, but its in line with anything of that age/condition these days. I too prefer the original Mk1 XR2 with the round lights.

That takes me back - my first car was a Mk1 Fiesta 1.3 Sport, with incredibly stiff suspension and do damping whatsoever. It went round corners very fast, but only if the roads were smooth! I then ruined the handling by fitting a set of the pepperpot alloys as on the one in that pic, lesson learned. 185 tyres were total overkill!
PhilD

I imagine everyone old enough to remember when run of the mill classics (i.e. not supercar/super-rare stuff) were new has the immediate reaction of "WTF?!", even more so if they are into cars and therefore noticed when prices/desirability hit rock bottom. However, after a bit of thought it makes sense. No offence 12th!
Bob Sacamano

I suppose to put it in perspective; in 20 years time someone might post a link to Twelfth's pristine RS4 and comment on the madness of someone asking 25k for a 25 year old car, at which point some 40 year old might pipe up and say "I always wanted one of those but couldn't afford it at the time, look it's got a V8 engine, etc, etc,"
Alf McQueef

The depreciation trajectory of cars is interesting - if they sold well, even quite desirable stuff can plummet down after a while, then inexorably the better ones come back up. The amount they come up is increasing markedly in recent years.

Some of my more car-liking old school friends were into Corrados - one had a VR6 and wanted to sell it (this must be 10 years ago or so now) but they were depreciating like a stone at the time, having initially held value very well. He utterly refused to sell it for the sub-5k it was then allegedly worth, and I thought he was mad - but of course they rose back up. I bet an excellent VR6 with leather trim is worth quite a bit now.

Dear to my heart, I have not kept an eye on 156 and 147 GTA prices but I think they will do much the same thing - the good ones anyway. Cracking, exciting cars probably better as a toy than as a daily driver in their day, and examples of how big engines were stuffed into small cars - not something lasting for much longer.
Frank Bullitt

gonnabuildabuggy wrote:
Bob Sacamano wrote:
As I've said before; if you're a dealer and you get hold of one of these in mint condition it's worth chancing your arm for a few weeks and stick it on sale at a daft price - you might just catch some bloke with a bit of spare cash and wanting to acquire the dream car of his youth that he couldn't afford then.


That's exactly how classic dealers seem to work - prices a lot higher than private sales but a different market.

Classic sales are all about people buying what they can finally afford and lusted after when younger IMHO.

That price doesn't look too mad when I consider what I've sold my classics for privately.

EDIT - quick look through car and classic shows a few good ones between 6-7K with good private ones around 4-5K and some poorer ones at less money.

I actually got to thinking this would be a good car for me - small enough for easy commuting, modern enough but easy to fix. I've driven them and they are fun. A lot more go kart like than the Golf GTi of that era.


For 700 it's worth a punt, but at 7K that's a bad joke.

Seriously, I can see why stuff like this that's in top condition can fetch a few K's, but not at this level.
Tim

Alf McQueef wrote:

Dear to my heart, I have not kept an eye on 156 and 147 GTA prices but I think they will do much the same thing - the good ones anyway.


I've been keeping an eye on them and the price is rising slightly but there's a late pearlescent white 147 that's been for sale for about 3 years at 9k from a dealer and it hasn't moved.
PhilD

Alf McQueef wrote:


Some of my more car-liking old school friends were into Corrados - one had a VR6 and wanted to sell it (this must be 10 years ago or so now) but they were depreciating like a stone at the time, having initially held value very well. He utterly refused to sell it for the sub-5k it was then allegedly worth, and I thought he was mad - but of course they rose back up. I bet an excellent VR6 with leather trim is worth quite a bit now.



Problem is, if he's used it since then I doubt the running costs are much less than the appreciation.
gonnabuildabuggy

PhilD wrote:
Alf McQueef wrote:


Some of my more car-liking old school friends were into Corrados - one had a VR6 and wanted to sell it (this must be 10 years ago or so now) but they were depreciating like a stone at the time, having initially held value very well. He utterly refused to sell it for the sub-5k it was then allegedly worth, and I thought he was mad - but of course they rose back up. I bet an excellent VR6 with leather trim is worth quite a bit now.



Problem is, if he's used it since then I doubt the running costs are much less than the appreciation.


It will work out cheaper than most stuff no matter what when you combine depreciation/appreciation with running costs (which aren't that great if you insure it as a classic (it will have cheap road tax due to it's age).

I met a guy with a nice RS2000 when I had the Sprint. He'd paid about 3000 for it years and years ago, it had gone down to being worth buttons and was now worth about 10K.

If you've got space/storage then keeping a car is pretty cheap - the MX5 costs me 150 insurance, 55 MOT and 200 (ish) road tax per annum, with zero depreciation. I more than covered running costs including storage on the GTI, Sprint and E30 (though I'm sure I won't on the MX5).

(BTW - I'd not spend 7K on an XR2 myself but I don't think it would be a more expensive ownership proposition evan at that price than most things we own).
Tim

The only problem with these modern classics is that they're now at an age where cheap ones will require bodywork* (probably quite a lot) and that can be a venture into the unknown in terms of cost.









* I exclude Corrados from that as any surviving ones probably had the bodywork done about 10 years ago.
Scouse

17k for a Capri! It's a Brooklands, but even so..

http://forsale.classicandperforma....com/car/53e4acb1b600c1dc7ad1f396
gonnabuildabuggy

Tim wrote:
The only problem with these modern classics is that they're now at an age where cheap ones will require bodywork* (probably quite a lot) and that can be a venture into the unknown in terms of cost.


Yep, a rough one can easily cost more than the price of a good one to put right.

Garaging makes a big difference though.
PhilD

gonnabuildabuggy wrote:
PhilD wrote:
Alf McQueef wrote:


Some of my more car-liking old school friends were into Corrados - one had a VR6 and wanted to sell it (this must be 10 years ago or so now) but they were depreciating like a stone at the time, having initially held value very well. He utterly refused to sell it for the sub-5k it was then allegedly worth, and I thought he was mad - but of course they rose back up. I bet an excellent VR6 with leather trim is worth quite a bit now.



Problem is, if he's used it since then I doubt the running costs are much less than the appreciation.


It will work out cheaper than most stuff no matter what when you combine depreciation/appreciation with running costs (which aren't that great if you insure it as a classic (it will have cheap road tax due to it's age).



I just meant the equation of "if I keep it for 10 years it will be worth a lot more" is flawed. You have just given an example where you spend 400 a year, so in 10 years thats 4k. Corrado will have gone from 5k to what, 10k? so only a 1k profit.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

yes, but what about the availability of spares for ageing XR2's, Capris etc?
gonnabuildabuggy

Chris M Wanted a V-10 wrote:
yes, but what about the availability of spares for ageing XR2's, Capris etc?


Have you heard of E-bay?  

Even spares on my Dolomite Sprint were easy enough to get. Stuff that had gone out of production was re-manufactured by the club. Not sure about Ford but I could still get most stuff for my 1990 Golf from VW when I had it.
Big Blue

Tim wrote:


* I exclude Corrados from that as any surviving ones probably had the bodywork done about 10 years ago.


Former colleague of mine still has a Bkackberry VR6 up to about 220k miles and totally unmolested. He must be in his 60s now and has had it for well over a decade. He's set the bar for me and die Schreibmaschine if I'm honest.
Blarno

Chris M Wanted a V-10 wrote:
yes, but what about the availability of spares for ageing XR2's, Capris etc?


Old Fords can be serviced/repaired with some bits of angle iron, a welder and lots of swearing.

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