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woof woof

Retiring - again...

As you lot may remember I decided to leave full time employment about 6 years or so ago but after a while I drifted back into doing some stuff via the computer mostly for companies in the US and Asia / far east and it's worked out quite well for me but all of the same issues that annoyed me in full time employment are annoying me again so I'm going to stop and if I have too much free time in the future I'll spend it doing other stuff, hobby stuff, days out and holidays  

Has anyone else retired more than once?
Big Blue

It was said my father retired when he left the RN in 1969. It is a mere inconsequence that he spent the next 30 years at the BBC and HM Crown Agents.

I retired when I stopped racing motorcycles; then I retired when I stopped playing squash and I retired from the greasy pole when I left Network Rail. Retirement can mean all sorts of things.
woof woof

I suppose you're right. You left network rail? Are you working now?

What I thought I meant was retire from working for money but money hasn't been the major factor for me since I left the computer service industry knocking on 20 years ago. My last job was a stepping stone that lasted 12 years and my latest "work" has just been for the challenge and the interest. I would say I'm lucky but as I got up early and got home late for decades to get this lucky I wont. As I said in another thread, first world problems.

So, I'll not be retiring again just shifting my energies. LI has been lucky too and will shortly be doing something else. I have no intention of being under anyones feet 24/7 and neither has she, she'd like to volunteer for something and that's something I'd maybe like to do too.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

I have no idea when I'll be able to afford to retire the first time !
Not for a long while yet, that's for sure
Bob Sacamano

woof woof wrote:
I suppose you're right. You left network rail? Are you working now?

What I thought I meant was retire from working for money but money hasn't been the major factor for me since I left the computer service industry knocking on 20 years ago. My last job was a stepping stone that lasted 12 years and my latest "work" has just been for the challenge and the interest. I would say I'm lucky but as I got up early and got home late for decades to get this lucky I wont. As I said in another thread, first world problems.

So, I'll not be retiring again just shifting my energies. LI has been lucky too and will shortly be doing something else. I have no intention of being under anyones feet 24/7 and neither has she, she'd like to volunteer for something and that's something I'd maybe like to do too.


http://www.mars-one.com/faq/selec...t-are-the-qualifications-to-apply
Twelfth Monkey

http://list25.com/25-most-dangerous-jobs-in-the-world/
Michael

http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news...lf-middlesbrough-made-up-10170660
Grampa

Re: Retiring - again...

woof woof wrote:
Has anyone else retired more than once?


No but I would really like to just be able to retire once - some of my contemporaries are retiring now with nice fat pensions that I'm paying for!  (along with millions of others of course)
Chris M Wanted a V-10

I would like to be able to retire tomorrow... or at least, be able financially to retire tomorrow
Bob Sacamano

Retiring is for quitters.
Big Blue

I could retire tomorrow but it would require a change of house, location, spending habits and travel habits. I'm prepared to make those changes at 60, not before.
JohnC

I could also retire tomorrow but my wife and daughter would ensure that there would be nothing left in the pot by the time I got to 70. The only variable would be how much I might get by selling the business.

Our payroll/auto-enrolment bureau is growing well and might provide the retirement/semi retirement backstop we need in a few years time. It is unregulated work which would make life easier and could easily be split away from the current practice and then expanded further. Depending on what happens in Scotland it would also give us the flexibility to move elsewhere if needed.

In the meantime I just keep on paying in what I can afford to the pension and look forward to another 10 years before I start to consider my position carefully.
Frank Bullitt

I'm afraid retiring is of little interest to me probably because it's something that is far away - of course, that hopefully means death is too.

I suspect that when the time comes I'll do some sort of phased retirement, working part time on my field before stopping fully at some point although even then I can't imagine ever putting my feet up.
Michael

I think, like many others here, it's all part of a fulfilling life and retirement is at the end of it.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

Bob Sacamano wrote:
Retiring is for quitters.

Not just quitters but for people who have many interests outside of work, that work prevents them from indulging in (and also the work is necessary to pay for the indulgences).  If I could afford to retire tomorrow and had the funds, I wouldn't find myself short of things to do
Stuntman

I would happily stop working tomorrow if was confident that I had enough money to live a simple life every year and pay my bills.
gooner

Michael wrote:
http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news...lf-middlesbrough-made-up-10170660


That's a very long winded way of saying Middlesbrough's a shithole!
woof woof

Maybe retiring isn't the right word.

I got bored and frustrated when I worked in the computer industry and I just couldn't have carried on, I'd have gone postal. Plus I just had no life outside of work back then as I didn't have time for one. So it was time for that to stop.

My last full time job was a sort of semi retirement for my body and brain but I got too bored to carry on and too irritated at the politics and game playing. I felt I needed a change and to be honest my long term relationship ending and me going through a bad patch was a part of it too.

The working at home on the computer thing just started because in a moment of boredom and curiosity I replied to an email and it just went on from there. It's not something I went looking for but I'm now bored with it and sick of the same old same old. The last straw was my last little project, God they tried my patience. So, now that's finished I wont be taking on any more.

Despite what I thought I was going to do when I left full time work and despite how much I take on I seem to always have a bit of time to fill with something that offers a bit of a challenge. In the future no doubt there'll still be a bit of time to fill, dunno what with though but it wont be flying to the moon or lion taming.
woof woof

gooner wrote:
Michael wrote:
http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news...lf-middlesbrough-made-up-10170660


That's a very long winded way of saying Middlesbrough's a shithole!


Still, not as bad as Newcastle eh?

Anyway, there are lots of opportunities for advancement in Boro. I was talking to a local businessman last week and he's crying out for good people to expand his busy drug sales and debt collection teams.
franki68

Kwik fit fitters retyre often.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

franki68 wrote:
Kwik fit fitters retyre often.

You're treading dangerously introducing puns into this thread.  I suggest you keep a low profile for a while
PG

Retirement feels like chasing a bus that has just left the stop as you got there. Sometimes you get really close as it slows down and then the fucker speeds up again.

Right now I'm trying to put on a sprint to catch it in a few years.
DetmoldDick

I may have to take forced retirement soon. My job is only really safe for the next 2 years. The chances of finding a new career at 57+ are fairly slim.
This is the reason I have built up a small portfolio of rental properties.

Alan, could you message me with a link to this computer work you were doing?
Bob Sacamano

gooner wrote:
Michael wrote:
http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news...lf-middlesbrough-made-up-10170660


That's a very long winded way of saying Middlesbrough's a shithole!


Unfortunately, there's no getting away from it, Middlesbrough is a shit hole.

Fortunately, it's surrounded by beautiful villages and countryside for you to live in, and Newcastle is only 40 miles up the road.
Michael

Bob Sacamano wrote:

Unfortunately, there's no getting away from it, Middlesbrough is a shit hole.


But it is also cheap. Sell up and buy a house there and you could perhaps retire?
Twelfth Monkey

Hell of a price to pay, wouldn't you think?

My plans are pretty concrete - I'll stop in ten years, and should be fit enough to enjoy a long retirement with what should be a significant surfeit of income.  House'll be paid for and kids through university.  But then not everyone buys a house, and (mercifully) not everyone spawns.
Frank Bullitt

Bob Sacamano wrote:
gooner wrote:
Michael wrote:
http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news...lf-middlesbrough-made-up-10170660


That's a very long winded way of saying Middlesbrough's a shithole!


Unfortunately, there's no getting away from it, Middlesbrough is a shit hole.

Fortunately, it's surrounded by beautiful villages and countryside for you to live in, and Newcastle is only 40 miles up the road.


Middlesbrough was my local town when growing up (well, Redcar was to be accurate) and I wouldn't fancy living there at all but there are nice enough places that are fairly close either as you head up to Marton or Acklam and, of course, as you go down the coast to Saltburn. As you go slightly further it gets nicer (Great Ayton, Stokesley and all the villages that way).

Can't say I'd live there again, mind, even though my parents still live in the same home I grew up in I never get that 'going home' feeling. My best friend from school lives in Ingelby Barwick which, certainly where he is (The Rings), is actually quite nice and not terribly expensive.
Michael

Frank Bullitt wrote:
Ingelby Barwick which, certainly where he is (The Rings), is actually quite nice


I have to disagree but then that's based almost exclusively on the buildings which conform to the identikit style of every other new housing estate in the country. My views on such building are detailed elsewhere.
Frank Bullitt

Yes, if you don't like modern housing estates then Ingelby Barwick is not for you!

My mate enjoys living there and they have a good community too.
woof woof

I don't like cities or even large towns and as has been said nice places are within striking distances of shit holes no matter where they may be.

Going back to my days in computers I travelled quite a lot in the UK and I haven't seen anything I prefer to the east Cleveland area where there's good and easy access to the sort of coast and countryside I like. Kazakhstan is amazing but the cities are a nightmare and the heat is to die for, I've been to nice places in Europe but it's still east Cleveland for me smoggie to the core that I am  

I do think there's possibly an element of kicking the uncouth northerners in some of this. I may be wrong but maybe it's a possibility. I've seen shit holes in places in Newcastle and Leeds and the surrounding areas that make the shittiest holes in South Bank and Grangtown (Know those places Frank?) look like, I dunno, Chelsea... but it seem like Middlesbrough gets a kicking in many of these surveys.
Bob Sacamano

Michael wrote:
Bob Sacamano wrote:

Unfortunately, there's no getting away from it, Middlesbrough is a shit hole.


But it is also cheap. Sell up and buy a house there and you could perhaps retire?


True, but then I'd only go and do something daft like buy a 4x4 and a pitbull.
woof woof

Bob Sacamano wrote:
Michael wrote:
Bob Sacamano wrote:

Unfortunately, there's no getting away from it, Middlesbrough is a shit hole.


But it is also cheap. Sell up and buy a house there and you could perhaps retire?


True, but then I'd only go and do something daft like buy a 4x4 and a pitbull.


Pit bulls are out man. Where've you been?
Frank Bullitt

woof woof wrote:
I've seen shit holes in places in Newcastle and Leeds and the surrounding areas that make the shittiest holes in South Bank and Grangtown (Know those places Frank?) look like, I dunno, Chelsea... but it seem like Middlesbrough gets a kicking in many of these surveys.


I do, and Brambles Farm. I think the main issue is there's a high concentration of it relating, I suspect, to former industrial areas being largely the only notable employer and those industries either dying or changing beyond all recognition - where once Grangetown proudly provided workforce for British Steel, it now provides very little for anybody. If I go from Mum and Dad's down to the A66 and in to Boro it gets very depressing indeed.
woof woof

I'm not too sure the problems can be blamed so easily and solely on the decline of British Steel, Smith Dock and ICI. Many of the people in what are now the worst areas have nothing to do with these industries and no family history there.

I think it's more complex and sadder. As someone once said, there's nothing wrong with the place it's the people in it. Why is a complex thing.
Giant

woof woof wrote:
I'm not too sure the problems can be blamed so easily and solely on the decline of British Steel, Smith Dock and ICI. Many of the people in what are now the worst areas have nothing to do with these industries and no family history there.

I think it's more complex and sadder. As someone once said, there's nothing wrong with the place it's the people in it. Why is a complex thing.


What gives you the right to be so superior? To blame people in run down poverty stricken areas for the fact it's run down and poor is incredibly offensive and ignorant.

To quote yourself:

woof woof wrote:
I do think there's possibly an element of kicking the uncouth northerners in some of this. I may be wrong but maybe it's a possibility. I've seen shit holes in places in Newcastle and Leeds and the surrounding areas that make the shittiest holes in South Bank and Grangtown (Know those places Frank?) look like, I dunno, Chelsea... but it seem like Middlesbrough gets a kicking in many of these surveys.
gooner

I've done a bit of work around the Middlesbrough, Darlington and Stockton areas and I do agree there are some nice parts and I'm not being a snobby southern fairy deliberately having a pop at the northern monkeys. I get on well with all the people I've met up that way although some are a bit odd, but then we've got plenty of weirdoes down here.

I won't take back what I said about Middlesbrough though!
Bob Sacamano

Kind of backs up how retiring ages a person more quickly;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37307347
Rodge

I never retired but was made redundant a number of years ago.
I stayed at home minding the kids while wifey worked, and I studied part time.
This summer I got a specialist working visa and will be starting work with a company in Northern California for the next 3 years in October.
I'm delighted to be getting into engineering again and am really looking forward to what's next.
I'm also looking at cars I'd never even consider buying in Ireland due to high insurance and taxes, so am going to be pursuing something fun which may be fast or may be a proper 4x4.
The funny thing is last week I was contacted about a consultant position in Dublin that pays more than twice what I'd get in California. I didn't even consider it.
Interesting how quality of life has a much bigger factor in a decision than finances.
Roadsterstu

Great news on the job front!
Twelfth Monkey

Bob Sacamano wrote:
Kind of backs up how retiring ages a person more quickly;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37307347


Depends what you do with it, but if it's not a lot then retirement can be a countdown.  I worked at Marconi many years ago and the number of people who croaked not that long after retiring was way beyond what made statistical sense.  They clearly had little else outside of work.

But I'm fitter no I've pared back my hours because I've chosen to be active, and will keep on doing so because I have the time.  A retirement sat on your arse is wasted.
woof woof

Giant wrote:
woof woof wrote:
I'm not too sure the problems can be blamed so easily and solely on the decline of British Steel, Smith Dock and ICI. Many of the people in what are now the worst areas have nothing to do with these industries and no family history there.

I think it's more complex and sadder. As someone once said, there's nothing wrong with the place it's the people in it. Why is a complex thing.


What gives you the right to be so superior? To blame people in run down poverty stricken areas for the fact it's run down and poor is incredibly offensive and ignorant.

To quote yourself:

woof woof wrote:
I do think there's possibly an element of kicking the uncouth northerners in some of this. I may be wrong but maybe it's a possibility. I've seen shit holes in places in Newcastle and Leeds and the surrounding areas that make the shittiest holes in South Bank and Grangtown (Know those places Frank?) look like, I dunno, Chelsea... but it seem like Middlesbrough gets a kicking in many of these surveys.


Calm down. I'm not being superior, offensive or ignorant. Far from it. I'm also not blaming "the people." I am one of them, I wasn't exactly born with a silver spoon in my mouth.

What I'm saying is that the reasons people face issues is more complex and sadder than the decline of ICI.
woof woof

Twelfth Monkey wrote:


...and the number of people who croaked not that long after retiring was way beyond what made statistical sense. †They clearly had little else outside of work.


I've not seen anyone fade away due to an empty retirement but I did see three colleagues go down very quickly while still working.

The saddest was one I worked closely with. They were really looking forward to retirement and making plans... and a few months before retiring began to suffer stomach pains, put it down to the stress of it all but of course it wasn't stress and they were dead within four months of quitting work.

At last since quitting work my life has got better. I'm much happier and much more fulfilled.
PG

Twelfth Monkey wrote:
A retirement sat on your arse is wasted.


This. Absolutely. I think if you can keep active - physically and mentally - that is the key. If that means working on then that is up to you. But it might just as easily mean doing charity work or volunteering, or being active generally, if you can afford to do that.
Frank Bullitt

woof woof wrote:
I'm not too sure the problems can be blamed so easily and solely on the decline of British Steel, Smith Dock and ICI. Many of the people in what are now the worst areas have nothing to do with these industries and no family history there.

I think it's more complex and sadder. As someone once said, there's nothing wrong with the place it's the people in it. Why is a complex thing.


I didn't suggest it was that alone - however, as those estates no longer provide housing for the manual-labour intensive industries and many of those with a work-ethic have moved on, they are easily replaced by people who may not have such a work ethic.
Big Blue

Retirement planning isn't just about money (I've seen loads of articles on advice for "can you afford to retire" that just talk about the fiscal aspect.) it's about your newfound time. I hate having days off work at home because the time just slips away to nothing. You need some kind of action plan to fill the 50 or 60 waking hours you previously spent commuting and working because you previously had time for other things at the weekends and evening. We can all dream of the days of doing nothing but there has to be some interest. My mother is a real social animal and at 75 her days are full of lunch here, dinner there, weekend with so-and-so, weeks away etc. but W2.0 and I are far more go out and discover but hope not to have to talk to anyone. So we have to plan retirement carefully from an activity point of view because I'm fucked if I'm being lumbered with doing the school run and babysitting for grandchildren. My parents didn't neither shall I.
Frank Bullitt

One of my old team who retired gave me some good sounding advice - plan the first three months of retirement and before you know it you'll always have plenty to do - don't think 'I will take a month off' otherwise you will hit lethargy. Also, I wouldn't retire around my retirement age as its in the middle of winter.
PG

Mrs PG have been doing some calculations recently and the thing that retirement really makes you face is that you have to be prepared to cross the point from where you work and add to your savings / retirement pots; to where you work less and live off your retirement pots and run down your savings. †

And based on this few days of calculations, that mental rubicon appears to be the key. When you reach the point where you are prepared to not ever be "richer" (financially) than you then are, you might be ready to cut back and / or retire.

Big step! †
Stuntman

PG wrote:
Mrs PG have been doing some calculations recently and the thing that retirement really makes you face is that you have to be prepared to cross the point from where you work and add to your savings / retirement pots; to where you work less and live off your retirement pots and run down your savings. †

And based on this few days of calculations, that mental rubicon appears to be the key. When you reach the point where you are prepared to not ever be "richer" (financially) than you then are, you might be ready to cut back and / or retire.

Big step! †


That's exactly my thinking. Once I think I have enough, the presumption will be greatly in favour of stopping.
PG

Stuntman wrote:
That's exactly my thinking. Once I think I have enough, the presumption will be greatly in favour of stopping.


And you then have to really prioritise what you spend your cash on. For me, I look at my XFR and have to be prepared to think that may be the pinnacle of my automotive mountain and it's all downhill from here......
Twelfth Monkey

That or you keep it.  I mean properly keep it, and maintain it accordingly.  My motoring's been a darn sight cheaper this way over the last few years in comparison with chopping and changing every three.
Boxer6

Twelfth Monkey wrote:
That or you keep it. †I mean properly keep it, and maintain it accordingly. †My motoring's been a darn sight cheaper this way over the last few years in comparison with chopping and changing every three.


I must confess it always puzzled me as a kid that my dad changed his cars every three years until I found out about MOTs - then it all made sense. That, plus the fact a lot of late 60's/early 70's cars were well on the way to becoming festering piles of rust by then . . .
Frank Bullitt

Boxer6 wrote:
Twelfth Monkey wrote:
That or you keep it. †I mean properly keep it, and maintain it accordingly. †My motoring's been a darn sight cheaper this way over the last few years in comparison with chopping and changing every three.


I must confess it always puzzled me as a kid that my dad changed his cars every three years until I found out about MOTs - then it all made sense. That, plus the fact a lot of late 60's/early 70's cars were well on the way to becoming festering piles of rust by then . . .


Indeed, the MOT was something to be feared even twenty years ago but in reality so long as you look after a car and accept the occasional bill it can be relatively cheap and appealing motoring. My dad would buy a new car every 6 years and due to his obsession with always having it garaged (even when wet) it would be an MOT failure or need serious work after 6 years.

The A2 had its annual service at 118k and nearly 12 years old, apart from the service and brake fluid change nothing else was needed - they even send you a nice 'AudiCam' video showing underneath your car and there is nothing of concern (discs and pass still got about 20k on them was the only note), I mentioned to the service guy that it was relatively painless and his response was 'you look after your car and it's easy to see - not everyone gets away with such a small bill'

If the XF is the pinnacle of PG'a automotive world, why not just keep it that way - think of all the cash you save!
Big Blue

I did my mother's finances this summer. She's not spending anywhere near her income at 75. No danger of me planning that well.....
PG

Frank Bullitt wrote:
If the XF is the pinnacle of PG'a automotive world, why not just keep it that way - think of all the cash you save!


My logic says that I'll clearly keep it and maintain it. But as you once said, a £10k second hand car that cost £50k new, is still a £50k car to fuel, tax, insure and maintain.

My man maths says that a cheap run about would balance out the cost per mile.
PhilD

Get a little leccy thing to supplement it
woof woof

Frank Bullitt wrote:

I didn't suggest it was that alone - however, as those estates no longer provide housing for the manual-labour intensive industries and many of those with a work-ethic have moved on, they are easily replaced by people who may not have such a work ethic.


Something that had an effect on me was something I read about going from labourer to savage in three generations but I can't google my way to it today. Maybe you can. The relevance in this discussion is that I don't think it's as easy as saying that the decline of the heavy industries is at the root of social issue as maybe in some ways those industries and the way life was lived were a part of the problem.

I'm sure that the causes are many and complex but the problems are here now and we as a society should IMO begin to face them but I'm convinced that this will take a fundamental shift in how we run our society and I'm not sure that the wider public will be up for this at any time soon. A revolution, not as in people running through the streets but as in how we run our society is what we need to try and address the issues we face. †

A little story...

I was in my favorite take away on a Saturday night, two little boys came in, riding a bike straight into the take away. I'd say the older one was maybe 8 or 9 and the younger one maybe 5 or 6. The older behaved in a cocky strutting way while younger one leaned forward, contorted his face and shouted "You Slag" at the woman behind the counter. Where are they getting this from? I know the woman who works there, she's very hard working and works in the take away and cleans the toilets in a working mans club. To see these children behave like this and to see the woman's face drop as she was abused, yet again, as she is time and time again was a heartbreaking scene. What's the future for everyone in that scene.

This tugged at me too...

I watched a car pull into the bus stop, inside was a young women with what could have been her son in the passenger seat. Down goes the window and someone pops their head in. The car then does a U turn and heads off to park up somewhere only to return a few minutes later for the same thing to happen again. If you know where to go you can see this or something like it all day/night long. The transactions take seconds and on and on it goes. What sort of a life is it for people on both sides of the deal and what sort of an environment is that for a kid to be exposed to. What's the future for everyone in this.

When little scenes like this play out I just sink inside and it plays on me for days. Lives in squalor, poor parenting, petty crime, violence, abuse, drugs, no respect, no empathy and little hope for the future.

Oh well, at least it'll soon be the weekend.
woof woof

Big Blue wrote:
I did my mother's finances this summer. She's not spending anywhere near her income at 75. No danger of me planning that well.....


I do my mothers, luckily her worth is rising at a little over £100 a week.

I've managed to remain comfortable since leaving full time paid employment. I could start to take my private pension anytime but I'll leave it until I'm 60.

LI is ok. She doesn't have as much cash as me but she has other assets.

No jokes please.
Martin

PG wrote:
Frank Bullitt wrote:
If the XF is the pinnacle of PG'a automotive world, why not just keep it that way - think of all the cash you save!


My logic says that I'll clearly keep it and maintain it. But as you once said, a £10k second hand car that cost £50k new, is still a £50k car to fuel, tax, insure and maintain.

My man maths says that a cheap run about would balance out the cost per mile.


That's kind of what my parents did.  They started with a 107, but decided that was a step too far so bought the fully loaded Up!, which they use for running around locally.  The 5 series sits (clean) in the garage and comes out for longer trips.  It means that after 5 years, it's only done 30,000 miles and looks like it's just come out of the showroom.
Big Blue

Yeah my Ma had an E46 to ferry people about in and a 1999 SLK she'd had since new for herself. The E46 met a demise in the fountain and the doctor's wife did for the SLK in a crash. The DS4 does the job well enough.
Tim

Big Blue wrote:
The E46 met a demise in the fountain ......


You can't leave that story there!!
Frank Bullitt

PG wrote:
Frank Bullitt wrote:
If the XF is the pinnacle of PG'a automotive world, why not just keep it that way - think of all the cash you save!


My logic says that I'll clearly keep it and maintain it. But as you once said, a £10k second hand car that cost £50k new, is still a £50k car to fuel, tax, insure and maintain.

My man maths says that a cheap run about would balance out the cost per mile.


Get an A2!

Don't forget, if you wanted to top the XFR you'd have all the running costs and depreciation to contend with.
Big Blue

Tim wrote:
Big Blue wrote:
The E46 met a demise in the fountain ......


You can't leave that story there!!


A couple of summers ago my mother was due to pick me and some offspring up at Nice airport but called the week before telling me to hire a car as her car was undriveable. She hit "something" on the way home from the market one Sunday and it appears she caught the town drinking fountain and animal water trough a more-than-glancing blow before continuing her journey up the hill to the house.

I'm assuming champagne was involved but she denied it. The car was repaired and swapped in for the DS4.
Stuntman

PG wrote:
Stuntman wrote:
That's exactly my thinking. Once I think I have enough, the presumption will be greatly in favour of stopping.


And you then have to really prioritise what you spend your cash on. For me, I look at my XFR and have to be prepared to think that may be the pinnacle of my automotive mountain and it's all downhill from here......


Having been in and out of work for these last nine years has made me really prioritise already and cut my cloth accordingly.  I haven't even had a meal out since Prescott!  

I won't miss working and I certainly won't miss the worry of not having the means to enable me to live a simple, modest life.  Of course I would like the option of more, but keeping working is then an option rather than a necessity.

I really cannot see me continuing to work past 60.
Martin

I wouldn't worry too much about XFR running costs, a £50k car isn't going to cost much more to run than a 20-30k one really.  Not unless you start doing a lot more miles when you retire.   With mainstream cars it's the deprecation that's the most significant cost (I'm sounding like GBB now....!).  

It's,p different if you're running a used Bentley/Aston/Ferrari etc, they're a big step up in running costs.

So what you really need to do is buy the newest XFR/XJR you can find, keep that for a while and forget about getting a cheap runaround.  
Michael

woof woof wrote:

Oh well, at least it'll soon be the weekend.


Funnily enough that's something I never hear people are retired say.
Boxer6

Michael wrote:
woof woof wrote:

Oh well, at least it'll soon be the weekend.


Funnily enough that's something I never hear people are retired say.


+1.

Herself has been retired for nearly 6 years and that phrase (or anything even remotely similar) has yet to pass her lips.
PG

Martin wrote:
So what you really need to do is buy the newest XFR/XJR you can find, keep that for a while and forget about getting a cheap runaround. †


So from XFR for ever + maybe a runaround; we've gone in a few posts to getting a newer XJR. As it'll only save me money in the long run.   I love this place.

If only man maths could be brought to bear on all the other problems in the world. I'm sure that solving world hunger would be barely an afternoon's work.
woof woof

I tend to live quite a full life/week and the WE is still a bit special.
woof woof

Stuntman wrote:
I won't miss working and I certainly won't miss the worry of not having the means to enable me to live a simple, modest life. †Of course I would like the option of more, but keeping working is then an option rather than a necessity.

I really cannot see me continuing to work past 60.


If you get the chance retire as early as possible, there's a life to live and I don't miss the irritating bitching backbiting and game playing.

Twelfth Monkey

Surely that's what you come here for?
Michael

I assumed it was a cry for help.
Bob Sacamano

I'm only here as part of a phased rehabilitation back into the community.
Twelfth Monkey

And it's obvious that care in the community doesn't work.

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