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gonnabuildabuggy

Not mine

but my brother is very impressed with his new Tesla and the auto drive functioning.

I wonder how long before we're all driving something similar.
Blarno

I would have a Tesla in a heartbeat. I was completely won over by the one I had a passenger ride in.
JohnC

Re: Not mine

gonnabuildabuggy wrote:
but my brother is very impressed with his new Tesla and the auto drive functioning.

I wonder how long before we're all driving something similar.


If you manage to get a passenger ride and experience the acceleration from a standstill I reckon you will be impressed too.

It is only a matter of time before we are all driving something like a Tesla.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

Blarno wrote:
I would have a Tesla in a heartbeat. I was completely won over by the one I had a passenger ride in.

Are you sure you're not mixing up Tesla and Arial ???
Frank Bullitt

I'd love one too, perhaps it's a true example of making the IC engine seem...erm...old-hat
Martin

When either the range improves or the network of superchargers grows significantly (ideally both) I'd be very interested.
Big Blue

When they're not made by an organisation with a fucking mentaler at the helm I'll be interested.

Trip to Mars anyone?
gonnabuildabuggy

Re: Not mine

JohnC wrote:

It is only a matter of time before we are all driving something like a Tesla.


I agree.

I suspect the days of the fossil fuel powered car will enter decline very shortly.
Twelfth Monkey

Big Blue wrote:
When they're not made by an organisation with a fucking mentaler at the helm I'll be interested.

Trip to Mars anyone?


I maintain a very keen interest in the space programmes, and private enterprise has reinvigorated things.  Whether he'll get as far as living there I don't know, but I think you're dismissing him very easily there.
Big Blue

I'm still shocked that after over half a century of space exploration the idea of living on a planet within travelling distance of the earth is still considered as a sensible plan. It has been scientifically proven that there are insufficient elements to sustain human life once we get outside the Earth's atmosphere. There are probably other planets capable of sustaining life but by the time anyone got there they'd be in the fifth generation of space travellers, all in-bred and only understand nutrition as NASA paste and re-cycled urine. They wouldn't be able to colonise the new planet.

The stars look nice and twinkle a bit. That's about it. The sun is nice and hot and makes sure we can sustain life on earth. That's it. The only water toleave the earth's atmosphere is that which has been sent into space on one of these folly-missions and not regathered to return (as either urine, exhaled breath or simply unused). People are dying of preventable things on a daily basis, their tribes (for want of a better word, we're all tribal) see the solution as having more children to up the odds of survival as opposed to controlled population growth due to an understanding of medical science yet people are still shooting off into space trying to populate it.

Madness.
Bob Sacamano

I can think of dozens of people who could be safely shot off into space with no detriment to this planet or the galaxy and where 5 years of inbreeding would probably be an improvement.
Racing Teatray

Bob Sacamano wrote:
I can think of dozens of people who could be safely shot off into space with no detriment to this planet or the galaxy and where 5 years of inbreeding would probably be an improvement.


Shades of the Golgafrincham B-Ark.
Twelfth Monkey

Big Blue wrote:
I'm still shocked that after over half a century of space exploration the idea of living on a planet within travelling distance of the earth is still considered as a sensible plan. It has been scientifically proven that there are insufficient elements to sustain human life once we get outside the Earth's atmosphere. There are probably other planets capable of sustaining life but by the time anyone got there they'd be in the fifth generation of space travellers, all in-bred and only understand nutrition as NASA paste and re-cycled urine. They wouldn't be able to colonise the new planet.

The stars look nice and twinkle a bit. That's about it. The sun is nice and hot and makes sure we can sustain life on earth. That's it. The only water toleave the earth's atmosphere is that which has been sent into space on one of these folly-missions and not regathered to return (as either urine, exhaled breath or simply unused). People are dying of preventable things on a daily basis, their tribes (for want of a better word, we're all tribal) see the solution as having more children to up the odds of survival as opposed to controlled population growth due to an understanding of medical science yet people are still shooting off into space trying to populate it.

Madness.


I won't start the debate about where our financial resources should be spent, that's another kettle of fish.  But there is water ice already on the moon and Mars.  Small-scale colonisation is possible - I fear your science/chemistry is out of date!

EDIT: Rosetta also showed us that there is free oxygen in comets - our understanding of the solar system is changing all the time.  These are exciting times for those of us interesting in the origins of the solar system and understanding thereof.  OSIRIS-REx launched last month and will rendezvous with a carbonaceous asteroid in 2018, aiming to bring back a sample directly in 2023.  

I may be alone in being fascinated by all of this...
Bob Sacamano

Racing Teatray wrote:
Bob Sacamano wrote:
I can think of dozens of people who could be safely shot off into space with no detriment to this planet or the galaxy and where 5 years of inbreeding would probably be an improvement.


Shades of the Golgafrincham B-Ark.


Big Blue

Twelfth Monkey wrote:
 These are exciting times for those of us interesting in the origins of the solar system and understanding thereof....



Easy answer to that.....






Made in six days; on the seventh day He rested.
Bob Sacamano

Re: Tesla, when you get to my age a car that can also double as a defibrillator starts to sound attractive.
Twelfth Monkey

Big Blue wrote:
Twelfth Monkey wrote:
 These are exciting times for those of us interesting in the origins of the solar system and understanding thereof....



Easy answer to that.....






Made in six days; on the seventh day He rested.


I'm sure that you can guess my views on that old chestnut.
Big Blue

But as I'm sure you know from the Hitchhiker's Guide to the galaxy, it's the mice in charge. If you own a cat, you're in big trouble with the mouse up top.....
Twelfth Monkey

Particularly clever hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings, them...
JohnC

Bob Sacamano wrote:
Re: Tesla, when you get to my age a car that can also double as a defibrillator starts to sound attractive.


That idea has lots of potential - a small jolt if falling asleep, a massive bolt if you drive like a prat, a hair curling dose to the passenger seat if they won't shut up, or to the back seat if they Bluetooth their music through the sound system in the middle of your favourite track.
Twelfth Monkey

Full-on electrocution for people who won't keep left?
JohnC

Twelfth Monkey wrote:
Full-on electrocution for people who won't keep left?


First rule of the road and the first forgotten. I often long for the James Bond machine guns!
PhilD

Bob Sacamano wrote:
I can think of dozens of people who could be safely shot off into space with no detriment to this planet or the galaxy and where 5 years of inbreeding would probably be an improvement.


Wouldn't it just be easier and cheaper to build a wall around Middlesborough?

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