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scamper

Cleaning prodcuts - options

Off to Halfords soon. Not cleaned a car myself for years, so is the shampoo, clar bar, polish, wax, still the way to go now for a pre-sale clean?

Or is there some remarkable product on the market which actually works, is quick to apply and can miss out one of these steps.

The scampervan is white and the paintwork was machine polished a few years ago.  Perhaps as its white, but swirl marks don't seem to be a problem.
TreVoR

Autoglym Super Resin Polish is a good cleaner/wax and good at removing marks after washing.  I would only do a clay bar if the paint feels rough after washing - if it has been machine polished recently, I wouldn't imagine it needs claying.

The SRP really needs a wax or sealant putting over the top of it as it isn't very long lived.  I use Autoglym HD wax.

Failing that, I think you are better off online if you want the serious detailer spec stuff.
Roadsterstu

TreVoR wrote:
Autoglym Super Resin Polish is a good cleaner/wax and good at removing marks after washing. I would only do a clay bar if the paint feels rough after washing - if it has been machine polished recently, I wouldn't imagine it needs claying.

The SRP really needs a wax or sealant putting over the top of it as it isn't very long lived. I use Autoglym HD wax.

Failing that, I think you are better off online if you want the serious detailer spec stuff.


I'd use the AG SRP and HD Wax, too. Decent stuff, reasonable price. Halfords often have a 3 for 2 on cleaning products too.
JohnC

AG SRP has fillers in it so it fills and masks any defects for a wash or two at max, unless as Trevor says, you put something on top of it.

I would use a tar remover on the bottom half of a white car (use it after you wash and dry the car and then wash it off again after a few minutes).

I would also use some fallout remover which turns any metal particles purple and dissolves them - you would be amazed how much can be on a car if you live near a railway line or anywhere industrial and also around the wheel arches, from the brakes.

Personally I would then use a clay bar but it depends how good a finish you want and by the time you have done the above there isn't too much to pick up.
Big Blue

The content of this thread thus far:



Fuck knows what will happen when Martin or Chip Butty get on here: I will explode!

I use Meguiars shampoo and then their wax plus their interior cleaner and this weekend will be using some Autosol Metal Polish on my exhaust tips.
Nice Guy Eddie

What would people recommend as a colour polish or something to help hide small chips and scratches
Tim

Nice Guy Eddie wrote:
What would people recommend as a colour polish or something to help hide small chips and scratches


I've used Turtle Wax colour matched stuff in the past*












*I haven't polished any of my cars since about 2009.
JohnC

Nice Guy Eddie wrote:
What would people recommend as a colour polish or something to help hide small chips and scratches


None of the colour polishes are any use except for a very short time.

Something like Meguirs Scratch X will smooth off the edges of the scratch and make it much less visible. Chips are best dealt with using a touch up stick - if you have a colour coat and a lacquer, a useful tip to get a better finish is to mix the two in something very small, 50/50 and then apply carefully, building up a few layers until just proud of the surface of the surrounding paint. You can then use Scratch X or similar to smooth out the area once the paint has cured fully (about a week)
Blarno

I use:

A bucket of warm water and whatever soapy shit I have to hand. Failing that, I go to the jetwash at Morrisons and hot foam the bastard.

For my final wash of the year (September), I do one of the above, plus a coat of whatever polish or wax I have lying around.
Nice Guy Eddie

JohnC wrote:
Nice Guy Eddie wrote:
What would people recommend as a colour polish or something to help hide small chips and scratches


None of the colour polishes are any use except for a very short time.

Something like Meguirs Scratch X will smooth off the edges of the scratch and make it much less visible. Chips are best dealt with using a touch up stick - if you have a colour coat and a lacquer, a useful tip to get a better finish is to mix the two in something very small, 50/50 and then apply carefully, building up a few layers until just proud of the surface of the surrounding paint. You can then use Scratch X or similar to smooth out the area once the paint has cured fully (about a week)


Cheers john, whenever I attempt chips with a touch up stick it turns into a terrible mess. so, pouring the paint and lacquer into the same Tupperware dish is the way forward?
JohnC

Nice Guy Eddie wrote:

Cheers john, whenever I attempt chips with a touch up stick it turns into a terrible mess. so, pouring the paint and lacquer into the same Tupperware dish is the way forward?


Unless Tupperware have downsized recently that might cost a fair bit in paint. I use old bottle caps and only two or three drops of each. I should have said that unless you have an extremely fine brush, a steady hand and great vision a fine cocktail stick (or a few) are much easier to use and can get in to the corners without overlapping on to the good paint.
Big Blue

Can we make this a "detailing" sticky?

TreVoR

Big Blue wrote:
Can we make this a "detailing" sticky?



Hey, I don't detail any more. Even the TVR only gets a quick wash to keep it clean and a polish and wax once a year.

I was obsessive to Martin's levels about the Subaru.  I have chilled out remarkably in the last couple of years.  The Defender is filthy with road salt at the moment.
gonnabuildabuggy

Big Blue wrote:
Can we make this a "detailing" sticky?



Actually a good idea I think  

(Seriously)
JohnC

I find cleaning the cars therapeutic after a long week. It leaves me alone with my own thoughts for a couple of hours and helps to de-stress (it also saves me from having to vacuum or iron or such like).

Mark, you have probably replaced detailing with fixing wiring and other mechanical bits to get your own man time - I used to find messing with the oily bits was therapeutic too.
TreVoR

I think that is actually a fair assessment.  I spent a couple of hours tidying my garage last night!
Frank Bullitt

Big Blue wrote:
Can we make this a "detailing" sticky?



So long as we don't use that horrid word to describe it - cleaning and polishing.
gooner

I need to start thinking of polishing out all the scratches on the Insignia at some point. I might pick your lots brains about it at Prescott.
Martin

John has way more advanced skills than me and fancier stuff.  I don't spend anywhere near as much time on the cars these days, but I do spend a fair bit on products that make it easier and save time.

I still use the Swissvax stuff that came lwith the Boxster and it's excellent, but expensive.  The BMW gets a bit less care, I would highly recommend Autoglym Aqua Wax if you don't want to spend much time polishing.  I use that every 6 weeks or so and it keeps the paintwork looking great and beading well, you'd be fine if the paintwork is in decent condition.  It doesn't take any longer than drying the car really.

I'd also recommend Bildt Hamber products, especially their wheel cleaner, which is amazing.  I couldn't get the summer wheels perfectly clean using Meguirs Hot rims, tar remover and iron X.  One application of Auto Wheel and they were perfect, so I've been using that for the last year and I can get away with spray / leave / jet wash and they're done.  I have just bought 5 litres (58), which should keep me going for a while.
Blarno

As Frank said, detailing is not a word. It is hateful and only used by the polish fairies to describe their habit.
JohnC

If you just want something to give a really good shine, take minutes to do and last a month, then this is seriously hard to beat:

http://www.eurocarparts.com/ecp/p...iler/?549992160&0&cc5_761

It is best used after the car has been dried but it works nearly as well with a few squirts for a large panel which you then spread with the drying cloth. The car is dried, protected and shiny in 5 minutes.
Alf McQueef

I have stuck by some wisdom I read many moons ago: use a claybar first and it does not really matter what wax/polish/nanotechunobtaniumshit you use. using a clay bar on anything up to the waistline, the nose and tail, and anything else that is not totally smooth, plus on scratches and marks, preps the paint so that the wax or polish can be swiftly applied and removed. Clay bars remove tar instantly so that's a step removed as well, and it prevents needing to put any effort into the waxing, its just a gentle wipe on and off.

Personally I find the meguiars waxes incredibly easy to use as they leave so little residue, and I find little benefit from multi stage stuff. The cleaner wax and NXT are both great. I have also used the Armor All wax which is supposed to keep cars clean (appeals to me!) and I have a gift pack of Autoglym which I will not turn my nose up. The old Super Resin was a total bastard with residue, I have not yet used the new one...

I wash the car, and clay bar it using a detailer spray, one time when wax the car the next time I wash it. I just did stage 1 with the C Max and it looks pretty good for that! The Jaguar is a year in from the Jaguar dealer- applied stuff, and has stayed by far the cleanest/shinest of any car I've had, so who says the dealer stuff is always a rip off? It took most of a day from a third party to apply, it was 200 well spent for me (which was half price...).
Martin

The Bildt Hamber clay can be used with water and it's excellent.
Giant

I thought his thread was going to be made a sticky?

I'd never claybarred a car and borrowing ExMrs Giants beetle seemed a good opportunity as it was clean but dull and a good clean seemed a reasonable thank you for the loan. I used Autoglyms clay bar and detailed spray, it's amazing!! So little effort to achieve amazing results. Really satisfying and while I'm not a big fan of the beetle, it's a easy and rewarding shape to clean, it really glistened in the streetlights once I'd finished.



gooner

I need to think about giving the Insignia a proper polish at some point. I've got a bottle of Autoglym super resin polish in the shed but that didn't seem particularly effective with scratches when I used it before and giving the weakness of the paint Vauxhall have used I'm too nervous to use T Cut. Can anyone recommend a decent polish that's good on surface scratches - mostly caused by the foliage from the country lanes we have around here!
PG

Martin wrote:
..I would highly recommend Autoglym Aqua Wax if you don't want to spend much time polishing. I use that every 6 weeks or so and it keeps the paintwork looking great and beading well, you'd be fine if the paintwork is in decent condition. It doesn't take any longer than drying the car really....


I agree re AG Aqua Wax. I've used it on both the XF's (that had been Lifeshined by the dealer before I took delivery) and it is really easy to use and gives great results. Also removes any worry about hard water spots on he paintwork.
Martin

I gave the winter wheels a quick blast with the pressure washer before I took them off and then left them for 5 months or so.  They were really dirty in parts, especially the BMW set, along with the black spots that are usually so hard to remove.  I've had to resort to a clay bar in the past.

I sprayed them with Bildt Hamber Auto Wheel, left it to go purple, them rinsed with the pressure washer.  That alone got them almost perfect, just a few black spots, so i sprayed those areas again and agitated with a brush before rinsing again.  They looked like new again and it took a fraction of the time it used to.  I've applied wheel polish, so they're ready to go on.
TreVoR

I am awaiting a rotary polishing kit from Amazon along with some Farecla G3. I've partially resprayed the Defender bonnet as there was some blistering which came away the last time I washed it. I can't generate enough friction to polish the paint to a shine by hand so it looks a little matt in places at the moment.
Tim

What can you lot recommend for interior cleaning and in particular for leather seats?
JohnC

Tim wrote:
What can you lot recommend for interior cleaning and in particular for leather seats?


Dr Leather wipes - Dr Leather has all sorts of treatment/care products and they all work well.

The wipes will also help restore shiny steering wheels. They can't do a complete restore but a few regular gentle wipes make a massive difference.

Don't rub the wipes hard because virtually all modern leather is just a coloured coating and rough treatment will lift the colour - they just need a regular gentle wipe and then a gentle rub with a microfiber.
JohnC

gooner wrote:
I need to think about giving the Insignia a proper polish at some point. I've got a bottle of Autoglym super resin polish in the shed but that didn't seem particularly effective with scratches when I used it before and giving the weakness of the paint Vauxhall have used I'm too nervous to use T Cut. Can anyone recommend a decent polish that's good on surface scratches - mostly caused by the foliage from the country lanes we have around here!


It depends on what you want to do.

Hand polishing scratches out of paint on a whole car is a massive job. Even the use of a DA (dual action) polisher could take a whole day to do it properly, using firstly a cutting polish and then a finishing polish.

A rotary polisher like Trevor has just bought is the quickest solution but you also need a lot of experience because it is easy to burn straight through the clear top coat (it only takes about 15 to 20 seconds especially on panel creases and corners when using a decent cutting polish). It should be possible to do a whole car in about half a day with a rotary with 2 stages of polish.

I have some old school Menzerna 203 for medium cut and 106 for final finish but if I want to save some time, I have found that Gtechniq P1 will do a very good job of removing minor scratches and leaving a good enough finish that it doesn't need finishing. It can also be used by hand but I would recommend using a polishing pad and not just a cloth, to get a better finish and a quicker result - you would probably need two pads, one a medium cut and one a finishing pad.

The best hand polishes are probably Meguiars Scratch X for helping remove or hide scratches or Meguiars Ultimate Polish which is a bit less severe and is more suitable for doing the whole car.

If on the other hand you want to make it look better before it goes back, give the scratches a go with Scratch X and then give the car 2 or 3 goings over with Autoglym Super Resin Polish which has fillers in it and will cover up any minor blemishes for a wash or two.
Chris M Wanted a V-10

A very good tip I recently came across on another car forum.....
if you get polish on black/grey plastic external trim and it stains it white, a plastic pencil eraser works wonders at getting the plastic back to its original colour again.

I tried this recently on younger daughter's 2005 Fiesta trim bits, and was amazed at the results !
Tim

JohnC wrote:
Tim wrote:
What can you lot recommend for interior cleaning and in particular for leather seats?


Dr Leather wipes - Dr Leather has all sorts of treatment/care products and they all work well.

The wipes will also help restore shiny steering wheels. They can't do a complete restore but a few regular gentle wipes make a massive difference.

Don't rub the wipes hard because virtually all modern leather is just a coloured coating and rough treatment will lift the colour - they just need a regular gentle wipe and then a gentle rub with a microfiber.


Cheers, I'll acquire some of those.
Martin

Another vote for Dr Leather wipes and spray
Tim

That confirms the choice, they have the Martin seal of approval  
Bob Sacamano

Tim wrote:
That confirms the choice, they have the Martin seal of approval


Well they are the Dungeon Gimps' leather wipe of choice!
Martin

I'll take your word for it Bob!

I like any product that gets good results without too much effort.  I like my cars to be clean and shiny, but I don't put anywhere near the amount of time into it that I used to.  I don't need to escape the house any more which is the biggest difference.
gooner

Thanks John. I want to use a basic polish that will iron out the surface scratches caused by foliage and cleaning bird shit etc. It's going back to the lease company so I'm not trying to get a concours finish and certainly don't want to spend a day doing it. Likewise I also want to avoid using anything too cutting as I don't want to risk taking off the paint! I did see one of those scratch pens being advertised the other day and wondered if they would do the job (like I say, I'm not looking for a concours finish, I just want to make the lease company's inspectors life a little more difficult!)
JohnC

gooner wrote:
Thanks John. I want to use a basic polish that will iron out the surface scratches caused by foliage and cleaning bird shit etc. It's going back to the lease company so I'm not trying to get a concours finish and certainly don't want to spend a day doing it. Likewise I also want to avoid using anything too cutting as I don't want to risk taking off the paint! I did see one of those scratch pens being advertised the other day and wondered if they would do the job (like I say, I'm not looking for a concours finish, I just want to make the lease company's inspectors life a little more difficult!)


The etching from bird droppings can be quite severe - I would think that ScratchX would be the easiest solution for small areas that need particular attention. Another quick solution, which won't last long but looks good for a few days, is the coloured polish you can get in Halfords.

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