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JohnC

Bored?

This just makes my blood boil. Bored at work? Well get off your arse and find something useful and productive to do you prat: don't blame someone else for your ineptitude and if you really can't stick it, get another job!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-36195442
Tim

I can sympathise to an extent.
If you're 20 years into a career and have debts, a nice house, etc. then how easy is it to possibly have to give all that up and take a lower paid job to co enable you to change?

Don't agree with suing your current employer though
Big Blue

I think the issue of changing jobs and associated risks terrifies some people. I am made to be a consultant / contractor: go in, do what they ask, as it comes to an end find another one. Each time you learn some new "thing" and you only need the same set of anecdotes as the next lot won't have heard them.

When I was asked to leave the last contract it says a lot about the lack of fear of change that I had a new role sorted by the end of the following week. I actually enjoy the hunt 100times more than any job.
gonnabuildabuggy

Perhaps just work harder at your present job to get promoted, etc?

I do see many people "stuck" in jobs due to final salary pensions (stay and be bored but afford to retire early vs leave and risk losing a lot).

Big debts can be a major issue for people to avoid risking changing job, solution is don't take on big debts.
Tim

gonnabuildabuggy wrote:
Big debts can be a major issue for people to avoid risking changing job, solution is don't take on big debts.


What if you want a house though?

The insurance guy in the article was on £40k or something.
Assuming he has struck a nice balance in life but is bored at his job how is he going to replicate that income or alternatively suffer a significant income reduction but maintain the good place he's at?
Twelfth Monkey

The nature of a job is that you will do similar things; if you want massive variety that's up to you, but you'll need to seek it out.

As for suing, I do hope he gets (literally) laughed out of court.  Dangerous precedent, otherwise.  As well as a bad joke, that is...
TreVoR

Reminds me of this:


Nice Guy Eddie

gonnabuildabuggy wrote:
Perhaps just work harder at your present job to get promoted, etc?

I do see many people "stuck" in jobs due to final salary pensions (stay and be bored but afford to retire early vs leave and risk losing a lot).

Big debts can be a major issue for people to avoid risking changing job, solution is don't take on big debts.


How lucky for those who bought a house all those years ago for the equivalent of a shirt button and a few beans. People now have huge mortgages and get trapped and caught in the hamster wheel.

I'm kind of in the same boat. I get paid very well for doing the job I do. I'm in a sales role so I'm constantly doing the same thing day in day out chasing numbers. The conversations are the same, the same problems with deals, dealing with customers, dealing with banks involved in a dull product. Now, I'd love to change but it would take 5-10 years to get to where I am now in a different role, at nearly 40 I just think I need to make hay whilst the sun shines and come up with some plan to retire by the time I'm 60. All a bit depressing when I write it out!
JohnC

Tim wrote:
gonnabuildabuggy wrote:
Big debts can be a major issue for people to avoid risking changing job, solution is don't take on big debts.


What if you want a house though?

The insurance guy in the article was on £40k or something.
Assuming he has struck a nice balance in life but is bored at his job how is he going to replicate that income or alternatively suffer a significant income reduction but maintain the good place he's at?


That's a choice thing: stay and be bored but get the house you want or leave and potentially put it at risk.

I think you will find in any job that those who put the most in to it get the most out and they also tend to get far more opportunities to do interesting things.
Martin

Everyone has a choice.   I sympathise with people who find it hard to leave when they've been with a company for a long time, I'm only on my 3rd employer in 24 years.  Both times I've made the decision to move has ended up being perfect timing for various reasons, but I didn't know that at the time and it wasn't a particularly easy decision but I made it quickly and stuck to it.

Whilst it appears I'm in a similar sort of role now and it's not a big change in direction it's very different (much more operational and I'm no longer the 'customer') so is taking some adjustment, but I'm really enjoying the challenge and doing a decent job of it.

I won't say I was bored in my old job as I was completely in control of that, but it was getting repetitive in a number of ways and my opportunity for progressing was limited to my bosses job.  Which I was doing 80% of anyway, so the progression would have only been in title and money, welcome but not enough to give me extra motivation.

In some ways I wish I'd moved around a lot more, as I could well have progressed more quickly, but I've had enough variety within each business to keep the job satisfaction and reward up.
Big Blue

It is a hard balance and horses-for-courses and all that. I know what I'd like to be doing to earn money but whether I'd actually earn anything from it would be a massive risk even at 48 with effectively no debt. I still need to eat; heat the house; pay for kids through school etc. If I were a bachelor like one or two of my friends I'd be doing exactly what the fuck I want at this stage and that would likely be following the MotoGP circuit all year interspersed with stacking shelves at night to pay for it.
Grampa

Even the most interesting jobs have boring spells and/or tasks (I alleviate it by having a look on here!), and following the 'change is as good as a rest' theory I also do some voluntary work for the RNLI - which I mostly enjoy but even the last hour of a two day stint on the stand at the Southampton Boat Show can be a trial!

I theory I have an intersting job, supposedly being a 'creative' but it can also be very frustrating when ideas don't flow or don't work out as you initially perceive them.

But I would sooner that than the sales role I used to be in - it's incredibly frustrating to spend a few days on a proposal and then not win the job/contract, but likewise it was thrilling when five minutes 'flying by the seat of your pants' would win good business.  In the end, the nature of the business I was in (print) getting tougher and tougher meant that I was feeling more and more like the guy in the thread - but I took the plunge to leave and become self employed getting back to the aspect of the business that had originally fired me up.

Wouldn't mind retiring now though - but I think that's mostly borne of of being envious of school friends who went into the public sector and are now retiring in their mid 50's with bloody nice pensions.
PhilD

Re: Bored?

JohnC wrote:
This just makes my blood boil. Bored at work? Well get off your arse and find something useful and productive to do you prat: don't blame someone else for your ineptitude and if you really can't stick it, get another job!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-36195442


I got bored reading it...  how does it end?
BeN

There's lots of things one can do to make life interesting. Life is not all about work.
gooner

It's easy to think about leaving and I personally think I might make more money doing my job elsewhere, but I do get a lot of flexibility in this job, such as last week when my in-laws were on holiday but I was able to plan my days around the school runs by working from home and visiting sites within a couple hours drive from home. Having recently bought a house I'm also in the process of trying to replenish my savings back to a suitable buffer to ensure I can still pay my bills for a few months if I become unemployed. Until then moving job is a big risk if things don't work out. As it goes though I do feel my motivation slipping a bit this year but I think I'll need to wait until next summer to start seriously looking elsewhere. But there could be promotions comi up before then or they could start funding my NEBOSH diploma. That would be a good reason to stay.
Frank Bullitt

I think you can dislike work or not be motivated by work but if you are bored then that really is a line manager issue - if one of my team is bored then I'm not giving them enough to do, likewise if one of their team is bored then I need to give them more to do and delegate; having said that there is much repetition with some of the tasks my team do, we all get the chance to do some exciting good stuff far too often to get bored, which helps offset the bits people dislike or are unmotivated by; even my statutory compliance officer enjoys his work!
gonnabuildabuggy

Big Blue wrote:
It is a hard balance and horses-for-courses and all that. I know what I'd like to be doing to earn money but whether I'd actually earn anything from it would be a massive risk even at 48 with effectively no debt. I still need to eat; heat the house; pay for kids through school etc. If I were a bachelor like one or two of my friends I'd be doing exactly what the fuck I want at this stage and that would likely be following the MotoGP circuit all year interspersed with stacking shelves at night to pay for it.


Surely contract for 6 months in the winter, spend the summer following MotoGP?
woof woof

I can sympathise with guy in the link, not sure about a payout though.

Having gone though overwork, stress, boredom and sitting in meetings thinking that it was all pointless I'm not sure which is more damaging.

A change is as good as a rest and although I hope I'll never have to work full time again when I work now I find stuff that used to bore me mildly interesting.
woof woof

Frank Bullitt wrote:
I think you can dislike work or not be motivated by work but if you are bored then that really is a line manager issue - if one of my team is bored then I'm not giving them enough to do, likewise if one of their team is bored then I need to give them more to do and delegate; having said that there is much repetition with some of the tasks my team do, we all get the chance to do some exciting good stuff far too often to get bored, which helps offset the bits people dislike or are unmotivated by; even my statutory compliance officer enjoys his work!


I think sometimes it's just the nature of the work you do.

One of the things I did was ISO audits and I can assure you that there are few things as soul destroying and boring as auditing 9-5 for days on end. It can be stressful and it keeps you busy but it's mind numbing and think I'd rather be water boarded than carry out another audit.
Michael

As some have said it depends on what's motivating you through choice or necessity.
Some have dependants and may working to give them the best of life while others have a mortgage to make you weep just because they live in an area that isn't a total shithole.
I image there are some people out there who can afford not to take this view as their only worry will be when will the authorities find corpse of their mother they're living with.
PG

Frank Bullitt wrote:
I think you can dislike work or not be motivated by work but if you are bored then that really is a line manager issue....


This.

Research shows that the biggest reason why people leave jobs is not money, promotion or lack of promotion, environment or even commute. It is your relationship with and style of your line manager. "Management" in itself is a word that really annoys me. For management encompasses two aspects - leadership and managing day to day activity. The latter lots of people can do. The former is the real skill that keeps people motivated and happy. To much emphasis on the latter is the curse of all management roles.
gonnabuildabuggy

^ This.

Good line manager makes all the difference.
Frank Bullitt

PG wrote:
Frank Bullitt wrote:
I think you can dislike work or not be motivated by work but if you are bored then that really is a line manager issue....


This.

Research shows that the biggest reason why people leave jobs is not money, promotion or lack of promotion, environment or even commute. It is your relationship with and style of your line manager. "Management" in itself is a word that really annoys me. For management encompasses two aspects - leadership and managing day to day activity. The latter lots of people can do. The former is the real skill that keeps people motivated and happy. To much emphasis on the latter is the curse of all management roles.


It's a good point - my role is to manage the function of a department and how it supports the organisation, lead those who do that and support what they need whilst challenging the processes and performance - I don't feel the need to 'manage' anyone but perhaps I'm lucky with my team, my role is much more about giving people the capacity, showing them what the organisation needs and then supporting them to get on with it.

Interestingly, my old boss has moved to another similar organisation who pay him more than here but he spends a large amount of time managing poor performance and relationships with people who aren't team-players.
gonnabuildabuggy

A good team helps but my view as a line manager is that I'm responsible for picking the right people and helping them achieve their potential.

The only "problem" people I've had are one's I've inherited. I found you could get their performance to where you wanted it but it took more time and they would drop back quickly in to old habits.

ditto, poor line managers have been post re-structure when I've ended up with a boss not of my choosing (perhaps the feeling has been mutual too, who knows).
Alf McQueef

This is why I do a sales job. I just don't have the sort of brain that could deal with the same daily commute, speaking to the same colleagues, and so on in exactly the same way day after day, year after year. I like working in a team, but not living in each other's pockets, and driving to new places and seeing new companies all the time gives good variety - plus I've started staying over nights more this year rather than do massive driving days. I'm just back from near Norwich, and I took the bike and cycled in Thetford Forest last night.

Work is unlikely to be a barrel of laughs all the time but there are a lot of different things out there to be done, you can hardly blame the employer!  Generation Y are allegedly needy and want everything done for them, perhaps this kind of ridiculous legal case will become more common.
Big Blue

Work is generally a mixture of shit, great, ennui, frustration, stress, worry and a host of other things. It doesn't matter if you're a premier league footballist or a merchant banker, senior civil servant or coffee barista: that's what work is. Changing may alter the balance of their presence but they're all still there.

Today after a 600kcal session in the gym I started with a 90minute meeting in an underground room that had air you could cut with garden secateurs. The meeting was crap, largely due to the presence of two idiot stakeholders on the dial in who had they been in the room would have been murdered. Horrible. The shit and frustrating part of the day.

Then I returned to my office, another below ground room but with an atrium outside the internal glazing. There is a team of freakishly clever data bods in there with me and we were chewing the fat about stuff, culminating in listening to Spotify and talking through the technical possibilities of 3-d scanning vinyl records and playing the resultant file through some kind of electronic stylus. If you're interested the choices were electron microscope or hi-def laser. That was the fun part of the day. I bought lunch in a street-food market during this period.

Then I went across London to Dentons for a legal session. Very useful, enjoyable, informative etc. The good part of the day.

This is what happens at work. I hate work in the main but I like my life. The two balance each other.
PG

Big Blue wrote:
Work is generally a mixture of shit, great, ennui, frustration, stress, worry and a host of other things. It doesn't matter if you're a premier league footballist or a merchant banker, senior civil servant or coffee barista: that's what work is. Changing may alter the balance of their presence but they're all still there.


Agreed.

I've always thought that in general in a five day week, there is going to be one shit one and one good one. It is how the other three go that dictates what your feelings are.
Tim

What if they all pass slowly with little likelihood of any dramatic change?
Bob Sacamano

Tim wrote:
What if they all pass slowly with little likelihood of any dramatic change?


When's your release date? You might get parole?
PhilD

Big Blue wrote:
I bought lunch in a street-food market during this period.


Strutton ground? What did you go for?
Tim

Bob Sacamano wrote:
Tim wrote:
What if they all pass slowly with little likelihood of any dramatic change?


When's your release date? You might get parole?


Not until I'm 67 - at the earliest!  
Big Blue

PhilD wrote:
Big Blue wrote:
I bought lunch in a street-food market during this period.


Strutton ground? What did you go for?


Yeah - Strutton Gd. I usually go for that French place that has five dishes but this week I had some lamb from the guy in the next booth.
PhilD

Big Blue wrote:
PhilD wrote:
Big Blue wrote:
I bought lunch in a street-food market during this period.


Strutton ground? What did you go for?


Yeah - Strutton Gd. I usually go for that French place that has five dishes but this week I had some lamb from the guy in the next booth.


That French place is great, in fact the whole market is now very good. I've just bought a coffee from the Flat Cap guy, strong enough to keep me awake during a boring afternoon at work  
Tim

PhilD wrote:
That French place is great, in fact the whole market is now very good. I've just bought a coffee from the Flat Cap guy, strong enough to keep me awake during a boring afternoon at work  


Any chance you could get one sent up to Dundee for this afternoon for me?  
PhilD

Tim wrote:
PhilD wrote:
That French place is great, in fact the whole market is now very good. I've just bought a coffee from the Flat Cap guy, strong enough to keep me awake during a boring afternoon at work  


Any chance you could get one sent up to Dundee for this afternoon for me?  


Surely this is the (legal) high of choice up there?


Tim

PhilD wrote:
Tim wrote:
PhilD wrote:
That French place is great, in fact the whole market is now very good. I've just bought a coffee from the Flat Cap guy, strong enough to keep me awake during a boring afternoon at work  


Any chance you could get one sent up to Dundee for this afternoon for me?  


Surely this is the (legal) high of choice up there?




Yes but if I have one of those I'll just as surely have a sugar crash soon afterwards!

This week has been so dull that having the auditors in has brightened it up  
Boxer6

PhilD wrote:
Tim wrote:
PhilD wrote:
That French place is great, in fact the whole market is now very good. I've just bought a coffee from the Flat Cap guy, strong enough to keep me awake during a boring afternoon at work  


Any chance you could get one sent up to Dundee for this afternoon for me?  


Surely this is the (legal) high of choice up there?




Umm . . . . nope!


Roadsterstu

Tim wrote:
I can sympathise to an extent.
If you're 20 years into a career and have debts, a nice house, etc. then how easy is it to possibly have to give all that up and take a lower paid job to co enable you to change?

Don't agree with suing your current employer though


This, pretty much.
Roadsterstu

Frank Bullitt wrote:
PG wrote:
Frank Bullitt wrote:
I think you can dislike work or not be motivated by work but if you are bored then that really is a line manager issue....


This.

Research shows that the biggest reason why people leave jobs is not money, promotion or lack of promotion, environment or even commute. It is your relationship with and style of your line manager. "Management" in itself is a word that really annoys me. For management encompasses two aspects - leadership and managing day to day activity. The latter lots of people can do. The former is the real skill that keeps people motivated and happy. To much emphasis on the latter is the curse of all management roles.


It's a good point - my role is to manage the function of a department and how it supports the organisation, lead those who do that and support what they need whilst challenging the processes and performance - I don't feel the need to 'manage' anyone but perhaps I'm lucky with my team, my role is much more about giving people the capacity, showing them what the organisation needs and then supporting them to get on with it.

Interestingly, my old boss has moved to another similar organisation who pay him more than here but he spends a large amount of time managing poor performance and relationships with people who aren't team-players.


And all of this.

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